Tuesday, December 12, 2006

I'm just saying, is all

I recently read a New York Times' article about surfing in Cleveland. As a Clevelander, it's not exactly news to me, but I can understand that it is to a lot of people, and not even the kind of people who are surprised that they can't see across the great lakes.

One sentence in particular screamed out to me, though, that this was a bit of parachute journalism.

Given its industrial past, Cleveland largely turns its back to Lake Erie, lining the coast with power plants, a freeway and mounds of iron ore to feed its steel factories.

I'm filled with questions, author Christopher Maag. Why does fading industrial glory make a town "turn its back on its most beautiful natural feature? Would now be a bad time to bring up all the times I went swimming or sailing on Lake Erie, or one time I walked out on the ice? Or all the sunsets I've watched there. Or the time I tailgated less than six feet from the lake itself before a Browns game? Because if that's going to make this awkward, I'll just keep my questions to myself.

Wait, one more. About those highways and waterfront power plants. I wonder what that means for the Los Angeles area, where on a recent visit I drove past power plants on the Pacific Coast Highway? Admittedly, there were no piles of iron ore, but there aren't any on the Lake Erie coast, either.

9 comments:

Crunk Raconteur said...

What is little known is that prolonged submersion in the waters of Lake Erie is the source of the pheromones...

Although I must admit that, many times at the lakefront former Casa de Flop, I did turn my back on the lake, but that's primarily because his dog would clamp on to the back of my shoes in mid-step and I would have to turn around to try to reclaim my footwear.

CrimeNotes said...

I hate it when people besmirch Cleveland, especially when it comes to iron ore.

Flop said...

Crunk, that never would have happened if you hadn't insisted on wearing your au jus-flavored Birkenstocks

voidoid said...

Flop, I believe you're referring to the voluptuous San Onofre nuclear power plant, sandwiched between the PCH and the beach near San Clemente, which was one of my favorite surf spots as a teenager (because of the good waves, not because the plant resembles breasts.) The water is about 10 degrees warmer directly in front of the plant, and there is a completely different ecosystem over that 200 yard stretch of ocean.

http://www.nctimes.com/content/articles/2005/06/28/news/coastal/62705192845.jpg

It was made famous in the Naked Gun, when Lt. Drebin drove by and ruminated, "Seems like everywhere I go something reminds me of her."

Flop said...

Voidoid, I was actually referring to one I seem to remember driving past near Huntington Beach, as well as the one you can see from the Manhattan Beach pier (or the left side of your plane taking off from LAX).

There's plenty of powerplants and highways by the Pacific _ I guess Southern Californians turn their back on the ocean a lot. Which is too bad _ I love the beach at San Clemente and at Torrey Pines.

Also: The power plant is looking very poky in that photo. Must have been cold that day.

tommy o said...

aren't we all missing the boat here (pun intended)?

surfing? in cleveland? I don't doubt that it can be done since I've seen it, but, man, surfing in winter... in cleveland, hace fucking frio. these people are crazy move some place warmer to surf, dumbasses.

voidoid said...

I can't fathom strapping on the drysuit and paddling out into that icy, bone-chilling windslop just to stand up for a few seconds on a "wave," but hey, I'm from California, not Cleveland. So is S&M big in that neck of the woods?

Flop said...

Yes and no, voidoid, yes and no. But let Crunk Raconteur handle that one. It's more his speed.

And I'm not entirely in love with your "quotes" there, either. Winter storms produce 4-6 foot waves on the lake, sir.

Tommy O said...

Flop's correct. The waves in the lake can become rather large. Large enough to sink barges, steam ships, etc...